Take Me to Your Leader

The first three books of the New Testament (Matthew, Mark, and Luke) mention Jesus’ apostles arguing about which of them was the “greatest.” (see Mt. 18). Jesus once asked them, “What were you discussing out on the road? But they didn’t answer.” (Mk. 9:33).  Human pride is as old as the garden of Eden. It’s part of our nature (who’s “top dog” or “low man on the totem pole?”). The two brothers, James, and John (along with their mother) came to Jesus and just flat-out asked Him to for special positions of leadership next to Him when He established His kingdom, the church.

     This attitude still manifests itself today. “Climbing the success ladder” in the business world, competing in classroom academics, as well as sports at school. This can even be seen in some elders “lording it over the flock” at church. In preachers “trying-out” as they vie for the popular, higher-paying pulpits and to be the key-note speaker at college lectureships. It’s also human nature for the average, run-of-the-mill person to pick these types, or any of the other “beautiful people” that excel in their field. This can happen even if they’re a little selfish, mean-spirited, or ultra critical egotists who run down others to make themselves appear better.

     Jesus told His followers, “Whoever wants to be first must take last place and be servant of all” (Mk. 9:35). Jesus led by His example: “Although a Son, He learned obedience from the things He [willingly] suffered” (Heb. 5:8). A proper attitude of humility may make a person feel smaller as they actually become greater. Besides all that, some of us may wisely recognize that we would make a doggone good Indian rather than a chief with big responsibilities. We cannot all be “great” in the world’s eyes anyway, but we can always attach ourselves to a great cause…and help make a good leader’s job not so difficult.

-John Driggers (3/25/2024, V6 #13)

We cannot all be “great” in the world’s eyes anyway, but we can always attach ourselves to a great cause…and help make a good leader’s job not so difficult.

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